Why Whitetail Hunters Should Also Learn to Hunt Mule Deer - Land of Whitetail, Full Episode

Mule deer on a whitetail hunting show? That’s right. Even as white-tailed deer push ever westward, mule deer are still common in the West. Fortunately for whitetail hunters, filling a mule deer tag requires similar gear, and some states allow hunters to take either species.

Mule deer on a whitetail hunting show? That’s right. Even as white-tailed deer push ever westward, mule deer are still common in the West. Fortunately for whitetail hunters, filling a mule deer tag requires similar gear, and some states allow hunters to take either species. Your options are as wide open as the West, so long as you master the spot-and-stalk method. Learn more in this full episode of Land of Whitetail.

The spot-and-stalk method is pretty self-explanatory on the surface. Glass an area for sign (spot), then move in undetected for a shot (stalk). The trick is in the execution, and how physically capable you are over long periods of time. It’s an endurance contest that challenges the mind as much as the body.

The good news is that where whitetail and mule deer populations overlap, it’s simple to switch from one species to the other on the fly (provided you have tags for both, of course). Whitetails will cling to cover, such as river bottoms, while mule deer don’t mind open spaces. You might start out stalking a mule deer herd, but end up tagging a whitetail should you find yourself holding tight to cover to keep out of view.

This is what makes spot-and-stalk hunting so exciting. Unlike sitting in a treestand for hours at a time, the possibilities and opportunities change with every step forward.

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